MathsYear 1Autumn Block 2 (Addition and Subtraction)09 Adding More › Adding More Year 1 Addition and Subtraction Learning Video Clip

Adding More Year 1 Addition and Subtraction Learning Video Clip

Adding More Year 1 Addition and Subtraction Learning Video Clip

Step 9: Adding More Year 1 Addition and Subtraction Learning Video Clip

Dot the Dinosaur is doing her best to stop the volcano from erupting, but it seems that may not be enough! Luckily, her friend Stan has come to help. Help Dot and Stan save the day using your knowledge of addition!

More resources for Autumn Block 2 Step 9.

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Discussion points for teachers

1. How many more piles of soil could Stan have with him?
Discuss the meaning of the addition sign to remind children of its use. Which numbers are less than 10? How many piles of soil has Stan already thrown into the volcano? This question is open-ended for the children to explore.
Various answers, for example: 1, 2, 3 or 4 piles of soil. 5 + 3 = 8

2. Dot had 7 eggshells in total. How many more eggshells does she need to throw in?
Discuss how many eggshells Dot has already thrown into the volcano. What number do you need to add to 2 in order to create a number bond to 7?
5 eggshells. 2 + 5 = 7

3. Stan says she has 6 eggshells left to throw in. Is he correct?
Discuss whether 6 added to 2 will create a number bond to 7.
No, Stan is incorrect as this would mean that Dot would have 8 eggshells in total.

4. How many drops of water could Jib have dropped into the volcano? What would the total be?
Discuss how many drops of water Jib has already dropped in the volcano. Which numbers are more than 4 but less than 8?Which numbers could be added to 3 in order to create a number that matches the given rules?
Various answers, for example: 5, 6 or 7 drops. Various totals, for example: 8, 9 or 10

5. There are 3 paths that they could take back home. Which route do you think they should take? Explain why.
Discuss the calculations shown on each route. Does it matter if the biggest number comes first in the calculation? Does it affect the final answer?
Path B because it is the shortest route; it is only 6 miles long. Path A is 9 miles long, whilst Path B is 8 miles.

6. Stan says that path B is the shortest route home. Is he correct?
Discuss whether path B would be the shortest route to take? How do you know?
Yes, Stan is correct. Path B = 6, Path C = 8 and Path A = 9.

National Curriculum Objectives

Mathematics Year 1: (1C1) Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20

Mathematics Year 1: (1C2b) Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (–) and equals (=) signs

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