MathsYear 5Autumn Block 5 (Perimeter and Area)02 Calculate Perimeter › Calculate Perimeter Year 5 Perimeter and Area Learning Video Clip

Calculate Perimeter Year 5 Perimeter and Area Learning Video Clip

Calculate Perimeter Year 5 Perimeter and Area Learning Video Clip

Step 2: Calculate Perimeter Year 5 Perimeter and Area Learning Video Clip

Auntie Sharon, Alfie and Uncle Paul need some help calculating the perimeter of different areas of the garden so that they can work out how many plant beds they need to dig out and how many conifers they need to buy.

More resources for Autumn Block 5 Step 2.

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Discussion points for teachers

1. How could Auntie Sharon calculate how much space around the grass she has for planting?
Discuss which part of the garden is important. Discuss which calculations and measurements will need to be taken to find out what space Auntie Sharon will have for planting.
Auntie Sharon can calculate the perimeter of the grass to find out how much space she has for planting.

2. Help Auntie Sharon calculate the perimeter of the grass.
Discuss how to calculate perimeter. Discuss methods for finding the missing the side for the grass. Discuss what measurements are important. Discuss whether measurements need to stay in metres or centimetres and methods to convert measurements.
(17.5m x 2) + (18m x 2) = 71m

3. If we need to leave between 0.5m and 200cm for us to use the back door, how much of the perimeter of the patio can be used for plants?
Discuss strategies needed to calculate the perimeter of the patio area and which measurements are important. Discuss how to find out what widths the door is by converting centimetres to metres or metres to centimetres.
Various answers, for example:
Perimeter = (17.5m x 2) + (  4 1/2m x 2) = 44m.
44m – 200cm = 42m for planting

4. What could the other half of the shape look like? What could the measurements be?
Discuss what we already know about the shape. Discuss what a rectilinear shape looks like. Discuss what measurements are already given and how this helps with calculating the other half of the shape. This question is open-ended for the children to explore.
Various answers, for example:

5. What is the total perimeter around the driveway and grass?
Discuss strategies needed to calculate the amount of fencing needed. Discuss how to calculate the length of missing lengths in the shapes. Discuss which lengths and measurements are important.
57m

6. How wide could the gates be?
Discuss where gates would be needed and ask the children to suggest widths based upon the plan. This question is open-ended for the children to explore.
Various answers, for example 4.5m at the front so that a car could drive in, and 1m to access the house on foot.

National Curriculum Objectives

Mathematics Year 5: (5M7a) Measure and calculate the perimeter of composite rectilinear shapes in centimetres and metres

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