MathsYear 5Autumn Block 4 (Multiplication and Division)02 Factors › Factors Year 5 Multiplication and Division Learning Video Clip

Factors Year 5 Multiplication and Division Learning Video Clip

Factors Year 5 Multiplication and Division Learning Video Clip

Step 2: Factors Year 5 Multiplication and Division Learning Video Clip

The organisers of the Qatar Olympic Games need help with determining the best way to organise where people park, sit and stand at the swimming and diving events at the games. They need to use their understanding of factors to help them.

More resources for Autumn Block 3 Step 2.

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Discussion points for teachers

1. What different ways could the cars be arranged?
Discuss the lowest calculation that could be used to arrange the cars in Car Park 1 (12 x 7 = 84) and discuss what number needs to be added to this to make 150. Discuss whether this number can be made using a calculation that fits the brief for Car Park 2. Discuss alternatives.
Various answers, for example: 12 x 7 (84) and 11 x 6 (66); 12 x 8 (96) and 9 x 6 (54); 12 x 9 (108) and 7 x 6 (42); 12 x 10 (120) and 5 x 6 (30).

2. If the number of people on a row is above 5 and even, what combinations of seating could the organisers have?
Discuss the factors of 60 which are above 5 and even, and what their factor pairs are to make 60. Discuss the different ways this seating can be organised. This question is open-ended for the children to explore. 
6 people on 10 rows; 10 people on 6 rows; 12 people on 5 rows; 20 people on 3 rows or 30 people on 2 rows.

3. Is the organiser correct?
Discuss the different ways the seating can be organised, so there are at least 10 people on each row. Discuss number of possible ways to determine if the organiser is correct.
No. There are 5 ways to organise the seating for this event so that there are at least 10 people on each row: 10 people on 10 rows; 20 people on 5 rows; 25 people on 4 rows; 50 people on 2 rows or 100 people on 1 row.

4. Who do you agree with?
Discuss what each have said and what this means in relation to factors. 
Organiser 2 is correct: 24 has 8 factors whereas 50 only has 6 factors.

5. In what different ways could the standing spectators be organised, if they needed to be on equal rows and be split between the right and left-hand sides of the pool?
Discuss the need for finding two numbers which add to 120, and the different combinations of factors that can be used to make them. This question is open-ended for children to explore.
Various answers, for example: there could be 4 rows of 20 people on the left-hand side (80) and 4 rows of 10 people on the right-hand side (40).

National Curriculum Objectives

Mathematics Year 5: (5C5a) Identify multiples and factors, including finding all factor pairs of a number, and common factors of two numbers

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