Free Multiples Year 5 Multiplication and Division Learning Video Clip

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Step 1: Free Multiples Year 5 Multiplication and Division Learning Video Clip

Mara Thon is competing in her first event at the Qatar Olympics – the 150 metre hurdles. Through a series of races where the hurdles are spaced out in multiples of different numbers, she progresses to the final. Does she win the gold medal and become an Olympic champion? You’ll have to watch the clip to find out!

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Discussion points for teachers

1a. How far from the start line is the 4th hurdle? 1b. How far is this hurdle (9th) from the start line?
Discuss which times table is going to help find the answer. Encourage counting in nines.
Fourth hurdle is 36 metres from the start line; ninth hurdle is 81 metres from the start line.

2. Which hurdle is in the wrong place?
Discuss the seven times table and counting in 7s. The number on each hurdle should be a multiple of 7.
The sixth hurdle is in the wrong place: it should be 42 metres from the start, not 43.

3. What other possible number of hurdles could there be?
There are a number of possible answers here. Discuss which multiples fall between the parameters set. Refer children to the commutative element of multiplication.
Various answers, for example: 8 hurdles, 12 metres apart (96 metres); 12 hurdles, 8 metres apart (96 metres); 7 hurdles, 12 metres apart (84 metres); 12 hurdles, 7 metres apart (84 metres)

4. What possible number of hurdles could there be in this final race?
First, verify the distance that the final hurdle is set from the start line (72 metres). The answer will be found by determining which time tables include the number 72.
6, 8, 9 or 12

5. What is the value of the hundredths part of the finishing times, A, B and C?
The tenths and hundredths digit of the finishing times are not shown and need to be derived. The two-digit number of the second placed runner must be smaller than the third place as their times both have 11 whole seconds. Encourage children to look for the two multiples of 7 which add together to make a multiple of 12.
A = 84, B = 28, C = 56

National Curriculum Objectives

Mathematics Year 5: (5C5a) Identify multiples and factors, including finding all factor pairs of a number, and common factors of two numbers

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