Perimeter of a Rectangle Year 4 Length and Perimeter Learning Video Clip

Perimeter of a Rectangle Year 4 Length and Perimeter Learning Video Clip

Step 3: Perimeter of a Rectangle Year 4 Length and Perimeter Learning Video Clip

Belinda is designing the inside of the houses on the building site. She has to work out the measurements of different parts of the house using her knowledge of calculating perimeter.

More resources for Autumn Block 3 Step 3.

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Discussion points for teachers

1. What are the measurements of the other three garage walls?
Discuss finding the measurements of the other two parallel walls of the garage by taking away two lots of the given measurement from the total perimeter.
150cm, 3m (300cm), 3m (300cm)

2. What is the perimeter of the kitchen?
Discuss using the perimeter to determine the measurements of the lounge and kitchen walls to be able to find the measurement of the hallway walls and then calculate the perimeter.
16m

3. What will the length of the other wall be if the perimeter is 2m less than the kitchen in House Type A? Give your answer in centimetres.
Discuss subtracting the given measurement x 2 from the total perimeter of Kitchen A. Subtract 2m and then divide the difference between two to find the length of the other two walls. Discuss converting the units of measurement from metres to centimetres.
300cm (House Type A Kitchen perimeter = 16m. 16m – 2m = 14m. If one wall is 4m, the opposite wall is 4m. 4m + 4m = 8m. 14m – 8m = 6m. 6m ÷ 2 = 3m. 3m = 300cm).

4. What are the possible dimensions of the kitchen walls in House C if it has a perimeter of 10m?
Discuss that dividing 5 between four doesn’t work equally, so consider what two sets of the same number add up to equal 5. This question is open-ended for the children to explore.
Various answers, for example: 3m, 3m, 2m, 2m.

5. What different perimeters could each of the bedrooms have?
Discuss the total perimeter and the possible layout combinations. This question is open ended for the children to explore
Various answers, for example: big bedrooms measure 4m x 4m, small bedrooms measure 3m x 3m, bathroom measures 2m x 3m, landing measures 1m x 3m and stairs measure 1m x 4m.

6. Is she correct? Discuss how each type of house requires a different number of bedrooms.
Discuss how this means that there will be different amounts of space left in each house once the bedrooms have been planned.
Belinda is not correct. House Type A would have a first floor that measured 8m x 8m, which means that four bedrooms would fill all of the space and then there would be no room for a bathroom or stairs. House Type B and House Type C would be able to fit the correct amount of 4m x 4m bedrooms with space for a bathroom and stairs.

National Curriculum Objectives:

Mathematics Year 4: (4M7a) Measure and calculate the perimeter of a rectilinear figure (including squares) in centimetres and metres

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