Perimeter on a Grid Year 4 Length and Perimeter Learning Video Clip

Perimeter on a Grid Year 4 Length and Perimeter Learning Video Clip

Step 2: Perimeter on a Grid Year 4 Length and Perimeter Learning Video Clip

Belinda is planning and designing gardens for the new houses on the building site.

More resources for Autumn Block 3 Step 2.

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this.

Loading...

Not a member? Sign up here.

Discussion points for teachers

1. Work out the perimeter of each garden.
Discuss methods for counting the perimeter. How can you make sure you have counted every part of every side? Which unit of measurement should you use for the perimeters?
A = 18m, B = 18m and C = 20m
Calculate the total number of fence panels she needs to buy in metres.
Discuss which operation is needed and why. What method or strategy could we use to total the numbers quickly?
Total perimeter = 56m, so 56 panels.

2. Which garden designs could she use?
Discuss the key information from the question. How will you know which plans she can or cannot use?
B and C because both have perimeters of 24m which = £24 to buy.

3. What 3 designs could the garden have?
Discuss key information from the question and model an example. Model designs which would not be allowed and discuss why e.g) too many squares used, joined corner to corner instead of edge to edge. This question is open-ended for the children to explore.
Various answers, for example:

4. Work out the perimeter of each of your garden designs.
Discuss and model how to carefully and accurately count the perimeter of each. This question is open-ended for the children to explore.
Various answers, for example: 18m

5. Match the plans to the gardens.
Discuss what you will do first i.e) work out all the perimeters. After the task, discuss the methods used to match the gardens and plans. Which could not have matched and why?
Garden 1 = design B = 28m, Garden 2 = Design A = 24m, Garden 3 = Design C = 26m

6. How many different designs can you plan?
Discuss the criteria that each garden must fulfil. Discuss how to keep count of the perimeter as you draw the plans. What will you need to check on each garden? The question is open-ended for the children to explore.
Various answers where the perimeter totals 22m.

National Curriculum Objectives

Mathematics Year 4: (4M7a) Measure and calculate the perimeter of a rectilinear figure (including squares) in centimetres and metres

This resource is available to play with a Premium subscription.

Post a Reply