MathsYear 6Spring Block 1 (Decimals)01 Three Decimal Places › Free Three Decimal Places Year 6 Decimals Learning Video Clip

Free Three Decimal Places Year 6 Decimals Learning Video Clip

video

Step 1: Free Three Decimal Places Year 6 Decimals Learning Video Clip

Two Year 6 children, Alex and Sophia, embark on a school trip to the Natural History Museum with their teacher, Mr Khan. Before they can begin their journey, some baggage needs to be put into weight order. The bus driver also needs help selecting the shortest route to get the class to their destination. Finally, Alex and Sophia need some help with a card game they are playing on the bus.

More resources for Spring Block 1 Step 1

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this.

Loading...

Discussion points for teachers

1. Help the bus driver order the suitcases from lightest to heaviest.
Discuss how to order and compare the weights using knowledge of place value and exchanging with three decimal places.
The order from lightest to heaviest is: A: 5.795; C: 8.062; B: 8.592; D: 8.602.

2. This suitcase is more than B, but less than D. The thousandths digit is greater than the tenths digit. What could the weight of the suitcase be?
Discuss the place value of each digit and the possible range of weights the suitcase could be. This question is open-ended for children to explore.
Various answers, for example: 8.597.

3. Help the bus driver choose the shortest route to the museum.
Discuss the place value of each digit and how and when to exchange.
Route C is the shortest route with a distance of 38.253 miles.

4. Help Sophia choose the cards which match Alex’s number.
Discuss how to order and compare the weights using knowledge of place value and exchanging with three decimal places.
The green and blue cards match the number.

5. Use these digit cards to make the highest number possible and then represent it in a different way.
Discuss the place value of each digit and the possible order to get the highest number. This question is open-ended for children to explore.
The highest possible number is 9.750. Various answers, for example: Ninety –seven tenths, five hundredths and zero thousandths.

National Curriculum Objectives

Mathematics Year 6: (6F9a) Identify the value of each digit in numbers given to three decimal places and multiply and divide numbers by 10, 100 and 1,000 giving answers up to three decimal places

Mathematics Year 6: (6F10) Solve problems which require answers to be rounded to specified degrees of accuracy

This resource is available to play with a Taster Subscription.

Hide picture